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  #11  
Old 20-08-2017, 03:39 PM
NewToFalcons NewToFalcons is offline
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Location: Southern California
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Default Re: Newbie with some questions!

Another question, for a weathering yard, I've read on the California Hawking Club website that an open topped weathering yard is fine, as long as the perches are 6 1/2 feet off the ground. Does anyone have a similar set up? Of course the bird would have to be tethered though...and with a slightly smaller mews that might not be the best idea. What do you think?
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  #12  
Old 20-08-2017, 05:50 PM
PaulUsHilarius PaulUsHilarius is offline
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Default Re: Newbie with some questions!

Quote:
Originally Posted by NewToFalcons View Post
Another question, for a weathering yard, I've read on the California Hawking Club website that an open topped weathering yard is fine, as long as the perches are 6 1/2 feet off the ground. Does anyone have a similar set up? Of course the bird would have to be tethered though...and with a slightly smaller mews that might not be the best idea. What do you think?
Weathering yards as are compulsory (? ) in USA have two functions. Firstly to keep predators out, and secondly to prevent loss of a bird if it breaks free somehow. Of course a covered top would be needed for this. It is a good idea.

There are two stages with a hawk, one when it is in training and wild and needs to be tied up, and the other is when it has become tame and steady and can be free lofted. So a good option would be to build a weathering yard which could be converted to a free loft pen when the time comes. (If that's what you want to do.)

A friend of mine had his Harris hawk in a weathering 7 ft deep, 12 ft wide and about 5 ft high, sloping to 6 ft at the back. The front was 2 inch weld mesh, the sides were wood panels and the top corrugated plastic. Sand floor. At the start of retraining each year she was tied up in there on a bow perch. When down to weight, tame and steady, extra perches were put in at each end and she was free lofted. She was also free lofted in there for the whole of her moult.

Based on your original questions, I would say that 5 ft is too small a dimension if you are using a bow perch as that gives only 2.5 ft bating space, enough for wing tips to hit wall or mesh. 7 ft would be better. Make it 7 ft high so you don't have to crouch or bend over.

It is not usual to keep a hawk hooded overnight in the indoor mews, except perhaps at the beginning of training if the mews can not be made light proof. I always start a hawk in a totally dark mews, left unhooded most of the time, but sometimes hooded for the purpose of getting her used to it. I pick the hawk up in the dark, using a key fob torch held in my teeth to produce flashes of light enough to see what I'm doing and to see her position so I can hood her. I keep the indoor mews dark and when she is trained and steady I leave the door ajar when I put her in at dusk so she gets a natural fading of light in there. Also in the morning so she can wake up before I put her outside for the day. The room is about 7ft by 7ft. She is tied to a perch on the floor in the middle.
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  #13  
Old 20-08-2017, 05:54 PM
Navek1987 Navek1987 is offline
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Join Date: Feb 2017
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Default Re: Newbie with some questions!

Quote:
Originally Posted by NewToFalcons View Post
Another question, for a weathering yard, I've read on the California Hawking Club website that an open topped weathering yard is fine, as long as the perches are 6 1/2 feet off the ground. Does anyone have a similar set up? Of course the bird would have to be tethered though...and with a slightly smaller mews that might not be the best idea. What do you think?
Don't no what the weather is like over your end but if you have a 6 ft high withering that should be plenty high enough and have some perch 5 ft off the ground , here in England we normal keep are birds tetherd at Least 3 ft off the ground in winter st night in there mews due to the cold barrier on the floor , you could use either a high ring perch or a loop perch or make a platform to sit a bow on higher than 3 ft
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  #14  
Old 20-08-2017, 06:26 PM
NewToFalcons NewToFalcons is offline
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Default Re: Newbie with some questions!

Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulUsHilarius View Post
Weathering yards as are compulsory (? ) in USA have two functions. Firstly to keep predators out, and secondly to prevent loss of a bird if it breaks free somehow. Of course a covered top would be needed for this. It is a good idea.

There are two stages with a hawk, one when it is in training and wild and needs to be tied up, and the other is when it has become tame and steady and can be free lofted. So a good option would be to build a weathering yard which could be converted to a free loft pen when the time comes. (If that's what you want to do.)

A friend of mine had his Harris hawk in a weathering 7 ft deep, 12 ft wide and about 5 ft high, sloping to 6 ft at the back. The front was 2 inch weld mesh, the sides were wood panels and the top corrugated plastic. Sand floor. At the start of retraining each year she was tied up in there on a bow perch. When down to weight, tame and steady, extra perches were put in at each end and she was free lofted. She was also free lofted in there for the whole of her moult.

Based on your original questions, I would say that 5 ft is too small a dimension if you are using a bow perch as that gives only 2.5 ft bating space, enough for wing tips to hit wall or mesh. 7 ft would be better. Make it 7 ft high so you don't have to crouch or bend over.

It is not usual to keep a hawk hooded overnight in the indoor mews, except perhaps at the beginning of training if the mews can not be made light proof. I always start a hawk in a totally dark mews, left unhooded most of the time, but sometimes hooded for the purpose of getting her used to it. I pick the hawk up in the dark, using a key fob torch held in my teeth to produce flashes of light enough to see what I'm doing and to see her position so I can hood her. I keep the indoor mews dark and when she is trained and steady I leave the door ajar when I put her in at dusk so she gets a natural fading of light in there. Also in the morning so she can wake up before I put her outside for the day. The room is about 7ft by 7ft. She is tied to a perch on the floor in the middle.
Thank you so much, this was very useful. I will definitely set up netting over the top, it will be pretty high because there is a mulberry tree in the fenced area. I'm assuming the tree being there isn't a problem, but please let me know if there are any potential issues there. For the mews, I think I could manage seven feet in width. My problem is this; the area where I want to construct the mews is taken up with a hardware cloth and wood pen I used for ducks in the past, and since it has an expensive drainage system I'd rather not tear it out. What I'm thinking is that I can add a second story in the said dimensions, but once again it becomes a problem of structural integrity since I doubt a heavy wooden box of that size will be able to sit on the smaller pen. If I convert the walls of the pent to plywood sheets, could it presumably become part of the structure? I could tear out the top and build the box over it, then add a door connecting them. I will try to post a picture of the area and pen for reference if I have any good ones. I'm also reading a book on falconry by P. Dunne, and the section on weathering yards is helpful. Thank you for answering.

Here's the pen with my old ducks inside, they were very big, about the size of a Harris Hawk each but they were flightless. The pen has an automatic door but this is before I outifitted the drainage system and obviously the walls need to be changed since they are currently hardware cloth. Don't have pics of the weathering yard area but I can get those soon.


[/IMG]

Darn, pic doesn't seem to be working. I'll try again.
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  #15  
Old 20-08-2017, 06:45 PM
NewToFalcons NewToFalcons is offline
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Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: Southern California
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Default Re: Newbie with some questions!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Navek1987 View Post
Don't no what the weather is like over your end but if you have a 6 ft high withering that should be plenty high enough and have some perch 5 ft off the ground , here in England we normal keep are birds tetherd at Least 3 ft off the ground in winter st night in there mews due to the cold barrier on the floor , you could use either a high ring perch or a loop perch or make a platform to sit a bow on higher than 3 ft
Thanks, southern Cali is usually around eighty degrees (fahrenheit, obviously) in winter, doesn't often drop below fifty. Really I'm more worried about heat, since summer gets into the 100s, 125 is our record here. I can install a fan if temps get anywhere near that of course. Is it possible for the bird to get tangled in netting? Also, how do I make an entry into the area? Do I have to construct something or is there a way to utilize the netting and make an entry with it?
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  #16  
Old 13-09-2017, 02:34 PM
Sweedlepipe08 Sweedlepipe08 is offline
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Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Chester
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Smile Re: Newbie with some questions!

Hi Im also a newbie. I was planning to buy bird cages maybe or greenhouse for my birds. looking for any advise. I have 3 african love birds. and planning to add more. any nice bird sheds recommendation?
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