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  #21  
Old 08-10-2007, 08:58 PM
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Default Re: Rope Training

I use a dog lead/chain with the creance passed through the links in the chain. the results on my Tiercel Gos over the last two seasons were well noticable.
I've just started this with my Female Gos .
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  #22  
Old 08-10-2007, 09:10 PM
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Default Re: Rope Training

Colin,

that's fantastic.....but the real thanks is to Neil, I have merely plagiarised. It is posts like yours that make the Forum worthwhile - helping others get more out of their falconry. Have a great season.

Iain[/QUOTE]mate
The thanks is all mine have a top season to the both of you. colin
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  #23  
Old 08-10-2007, 09:28 PM
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Joe Hatton
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Default Re: Rope Training

Quote:
Originally Posted by Berkut View Post
Martin,
It is very straight forward. It is really a case of repetive calls to the fist or lure with the bird dragging a rope thick enough to make it really have to work to pull it ,as opposed to gliding while flying free. Distance for me depends on the length of grass , strength of wind and whether the rope is wet or dry. It really builds up muscle and greatly improves fitness and stamina.

Neil.
Spot on Neil,

Cheers Joe
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  #24  
Old 08-10-2007, 09:31 PM
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Default Re: Rope Training

I'm aiming to get my Gos coming at least sixty yards with a house brick in each foot then pheasants watch out.
Good thread
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  #25  
Old 08-10-2007, 10:05 PM
Turumti Turumti is offline
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Default Re: Rope Training

Rope training is a very old fitness routine. Indian falconers of yore used it for hundreds of years to get intermewed gosses fit very quickly. I have also used with my gosses, spars and red-headed merlins, and it does make a noticeable difference, in intial take off speed and stamina.

The old technique was to take a cotton rope about four metres long, and then boil it in a pot of water until all the air from the rope had escaped.The rope was then taken out of the water and then put in another pot of fresh boiling water. The process was repeated about four times or until all the natural starch in the cotton had been leached into the water. When no never more starch was visible in the boiling water, the rope was taken out and stretched taut between two trees and allowed to dry in the shade.

While still damp, the rope was then pulled back and forth over a smooth bamboo pole driven in the ground, in order to soften it. Once fully soft the rope was hung in the shade to dry.

The softened rope was then doubled and knotted at intervals of about four inches each, and the two tag ends were whipped with a thinner string, which could then be attached to the swivel or the leash.

The method of adding weight to the rope was simple. The falconer would simply soak the rope in the water upto a certain knot, and then tie it to his bird's leash/swivel, gradually increasing the number of knots upto which the rope was wetted, as his bird's training progressed.

The way I see it the only thing new in falconry in the past one hundred years is captive breeding, improved healthcare and telemetry. Almost everything else has been around forever, just being rediscovered as we move through the decades.
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  #26  
Old 08-10-2007, 11:01 PM
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JohnO31 JohnO31 is offline
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Default Re: Rope Training

Quote:
Originally Posted by Berkut View Post
Martin,
It is very straight forward. It is really a case of repetive calls to the fist or lure with the bird dragging a rope thick enough to make it really have to work to pull it ,as opposed to gliding while flying free. Distance for me depends on the length of grass , strength of wind and whether the rope is wet or dry. It really builds up muscle and greatly improves fitness and stamina.

Neil.
bloomin good idea that NEIL i might give that a go

i have heard of people doing it with the dog leads what recoil back but this sounded abit of a silly idea as it coud drag the bird backwards if its nackered

Ian
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  #27  
Old 08-10-2007, 11:03 PM
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JohnO31 JohnO31 is offline
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Default Re: Rope Training

Quote:
Originally Posted by Turumti View Post
Rope training is a very old fitness routine. IndIan falconers of yore used it for hundreds of years to get intermewed gosses fit very quickly. I have also used with my gosses, spars and red-headed merlins, and it does make a noticeable difference, in intial take off speed and stamina.

The old technique was to take a cotton rope about four metres long, and then boil it in a pot of water until all the air from the rope had escaped.The rope was then taken out of the water and then put in another pot of fresh boiling water. The process was repeated about four times or until all the natural starch in the cotton had been leached into the water. When no never more starch was visible in the boiling water, the rope was taken out and stretched taut between two trees and allowed to dry in the shade.

While still damp, the rope was then pulled back and forth over a smooth bamboo pole driven in the ground, in order to soften it. Once fully soft the rope was hung in the shade to dry.

The softened rope was then doubled and knotted at intervals of about four inches each, and the two tag ends were whipped with a thinner string, which could then be attached to the swivel or the leash.

The method of adding weight to the rope was simple. The falconer would simply soak the rope in the water upto a certain knot, and then tie it to his bird's leash/swivel, gradually increasing the number of knots upto which the rope was wetted, as his bird's training progressed.

The way I see it the only thing new in falconry in the past one hundred years is captive breeding, improved healthcare and telemetry. Almost everything else has been around forever, just being rediscovered as we move through the decades.
nice post mate very informative

Ian
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  #28  
Old 09-10-2007, 09:46 AM
Kevin Massey
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Default Re: Rope Training

Gonna need a thicker rope

Interesting results had by doing this.....way above what I ever thought it would achieve
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  #29  
Old 09-10-2007, 10:30 AM
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Default Re: Rope Training

Quote:
Originally Posted by ScuffMan View Post
I'm aiming to get my Gos coming at least sixty yards with a house brick in each foot then pheasants watch out.
Good thread
just leave it tied to the bow perch when it pulls it out, its ready!! although my mate tried this he reckons it'll be ready in about ten years
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  #30  
Old 09-10-2007, 09:12 PM
eclipse eclipse is offline
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Default Re: Rope Training

God what would you need for an eeo lol
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