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  #1  
Old 21-02-2017, 02:16 PM
Kruma Kruma is offline
Egg
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: Misrata, Libya
Posts: 3
Default Kruma Intro

Falconry is one of those things I've always wanted to get into. My father used to go around trying to catch falcons, and he talked about this with me all the time as a kid. He never actually caught a bird but he did instill me with quite the passion for them. I am now at that age where I have moved out from my parents house, so who knows?

The sport itself is quite popular here, and the nation is excellent for falconry. One reason for this is the tonnes of game, including two species of bustar
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  #2  
Old 21-02-2017, 05:20 PM
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Ingo Ingo is offline
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Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: Tervuren
Posts: 327
Default Re: Kruma Intro

Hi kruma

Welcome to the forum. Misrata has sure been through some tough times in resent years, are things looking better for you now?

Having plenty of quarry is a great asset & falconry is a great distraction
Hopefully you can get involved somehow out there....

Good luck
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  #3  
Old 21-02-2017, 07:50 PM
Kruma Kruma is offline
Egg
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: Misrata, Libya
Posts: 3
Default Re: Kruma Intro

Haha...thanks. Yeah, I can only hope that the situation gets better.

Funny thing, my intro was more of an essay, where I talked about all sorts of things regarding falconry in Libya, but I must not have noticed there was a character limit.

Just for the record, I do know how to spell *bustard.
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  #4  
Old 21-02-2017, 09:01 PM
Kruma Kruma is offline
Egg
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: Misrata, Libya
Posts: 3
Default Re: Kruma Intro

You know what, I'll just try and re-write what I wrote the first time. Brace yourselves.

Basically, after I talked about how there are all sorts of game in Libya, I also mentioned there being quite a tradition around falconry here. I believe that capturing falcons and maybe falconry as a whole was banned at the end portion of the Qaddaffi regime (I'm not really sure about the specifics or whether this ban was actually effective) but the sport is stronger than ever these days. This is probably going to be bad for the birds in the long run (if control measures aren't implemented ASAP), but it is a good thing for wanna be falconers like myself.

Apart from all that, Libya is also great for capturing raptors. There are a number of year-round birds that are available all the time, but the prized raptors hail from up North. After they have bred, these birds will migrate down South for the winter (and with them come the recently hatched generation). This means crossing the Mediterranean, which takes days. Many of these now hungry and tired birds of prey find themselves flying over Libya. Here they will stop to replenish their energy so that they can continue their trip down south. Now, Libyan falconers have even worked out where different species tend to land. Some birds will descend more slowly than others after the overseas trip, meaning they will land further South. From what I've observed, the preferred method for the actual trapping used by Libyans is setting up a quail wearing a snare-harness. Some of the more outdoor-ish people prepare a quail in a harness with them whenever they go out on a trip, just in case. My dad liked using a remote controlled car covered in fur and snares (he also made his own hood and gear). The return trip over Libya, back to Europe, is also a chance to capture those higher end birds, but it is more difficult this time 'round. The birds are often well fed and rested so the hunting isn't easy.

But yeah, falconry definitely has a place in Libya. If we could learn to breed the birds and not export them to extinction, that would be great too. Little chance of that though, seeing as they fetch such a high price. I'm just glad most Libyans don't realize that those tortoises all over the place (Kleinmann's tortoises or Testudo kleinmanni) - even though they cost around 5 dinars a piece here - they are critically endangered, can basically only be found in Libya, and would probably fetch a higher price than any Peregrine falcon could abroad. Whoever the next leadership turns out to be, I hope they really crack down on these issues.
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